30 Second English- Though and Although

Although, though, and even though

Although is used for starting a sentence in a way that makes your statement seem surprising.
• Although it was raining very hard, they went biking.
• Although she had very little money, she gave $500 to charity. •

The children played all morning, and although they were very tired, they refused to have a nap.

Though and even though
Though and although are the same. Though is more conversational.
Even though is stronger  and more emphatic than though and although.
Note that when the sentence starts with Though or Although, the opening clause has a comma after it.
The same ideas can also be expressed using however, nevertheless or nonetheless.
• It was raining very hard, and they went biking nonetheless.
• She had very little money but nevertheless she gave $100 to charity.
• The children played all morning and were very tired, however they refused to have a nap.

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Three views of the Future

 

This video discusses different ways that English-speakers use to talk about events that will happen in the future. The focus is on the difference between using ‘to be going to’ and using the Present Continuous (or Present Progressive) tense to talk about a future event.

The link that I mention in the video is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nMYqb8TKesA

The link is to the first video I ever made for this blog. I think I’ve gotten a bit better at making them.

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